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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> one more example, well, if you look at where our energy comes from, our molecular factories are called mitochondria. it takes place. that is our power plants and they are scattered through every cell and they have some dna of their own. most of our dna is packed into the nucleus, the darker ball at the center of every self, but there is from dna in the mitochondria to the did they develop mutations, those strands faster than the dna that is safe and protected inside of the nucleus and make copies of it and put it into the nucleus where it would be safe from mutations so the work of energy production could keep going without d-tn aerating without the mutations. that is an argument that a few biologists have made before aubrey. he's pulled together some interesting research. maybe that could work. again, very controversial and a little bit far out right now. he had some other ideas that they are even further out. i have to say. there is garbage that builds up in the cells, constantly the byproducts of what troubles some eub lamented that garbage from indigestible that our own bodies, hou
their careers and energy to serving their country and their community and a variety of ways. between them, they are formidable, diplomatic corps that spends from iceland to jamaica to d.c. to tallahassee and miami. they served from 2001 to 2005 during the same time when the secretary served as the national security advisor and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was a
they're not being stolen, pirated, copied. the department of energy, that was one of the three. the department of energy regulates oil and gas. so if you eliminate that department what happens? the department of education funds about 12% of u.s., the u.s. -- kate as 12 additional. you eliminate education. what happens? those were the questions that should have been asked of rick perry because those are the questions that might break through the difference is the people have as to whether or not the local of the federal government is too big. receptacle eliminated department and those assembly of a role to play in education. but it is that data, that evidence that is, i think, really, really quite important. now, with that said -- obama let me go back one second. caring about consequences. what i mean there is really, that's more about health care than anything else. is 50 million people, and i'm sure close to 50 million uninsured cannot talk about the plan to deal with it seems to me just to become a you know, an unbelievable acceptance of a condition that once you understand w
been through as a country over the last few years and to try to energy out what's gone wrong and how we can make it right. that's a conversation that really the more people involved in it, the better off we really are. first thing i will say about dangerous convictions, is to give you a sense of why i wrote it. someone said that you write to scratch an inch or deal with something that is bothering you, and that is the case with this book. and i would say, first of all, there is -- this may come as no surprise to you -- a real frustration with how the media, the mainstream media, and the partisan media, covers what politicians do in congress. a lot of frustration that you simply can't say completely what you want to say, even about what the problems are or what you're trying to do. and the second thing is that there is -- it was in my case -- considerable confusion about my republican colleagues. and so what -- confusion about what they were really thinking. so, i spent the better part of four years thinking and writing about revising this book. i do, as tony said, work for the associati
people who cry conspiracy because they could not energy out how a man like sweet mickey became president of haiti. and you can reality about it. the election was a mess. there were all kinds of things going on. he did have large support, especially in port-au-prince, and people did seem to like him and did have high hopes. so far what i can say -- i think the safest answer is that it's a little too soon to say what the results of his presidency are going to be. things haven't changed all that much in a general sense one way or another. my friends in the press in haiti i think feel a little more restricted than they did under the previous president. it's not in any way the repression that occurred during dictatorshipped of the past but that's a concern. but he is very charismatic and likeable and more willing to play ball with the united states, investment plans for haiti. of which -- i'm critical of many of which. but i guess we'll seem it's a dodge. but there you go. in terms of what is under the ground, there's certainly gold. there's certainly all kinds of mineral inside haiti. in the
, as you all know as well as i do, a number of problems. what is going to be the new energy policy, what's going to be the policy towards nuclear energy, the aging population. i could just run on, territorial disputes with its neighbors in china, korea. so there are a lot of different problems, but i think it's a crisis opportunity situation. the chinese use the expression -- [inaudible] in japanese it's very, very similar, and so i think that the new prime minister is the right person at the right time to take these steps but not limit them, as i said, to just monetary and fiscal side. so i take advantage to meet all of these other problems and turn them into opportunities. one last point and then i will mention japan at the end of my brief remarks here. my good friend who died a number of years ago, rudy dornbush who was a brilliant economy exist knew japan very well -- economist and knew japan very well from mit, was always concerned that one day the high amount of government debt in japan would catch up to it. over 90% of it is held by japanese. and now, of course, 235% of gdp, the l
's energy levels, their diets, their morale, their spirit. he worried about everything, no detail was too trivial. for example, he worried that british bees would not get enough sugar to get through the winter. sugar was then rationed. when he was asked by his staff what they should do about providing fish, he declared his policy to be, quote, utmost fish. that the supply, he worried that the supply of salt and vinegar remained stable, important for chips or french fries as we call them. i do hope you will read my book. it's full of photos with much new information about the wit and wisdom of winston churchill. there's also a very funny story in the there about plovers eggs which is too complicated to tell you about here. i hope i bring to light the two sides of this great man; the effort he put into getting adopted the policies he felt to be in his country's interests and the human side of churchill, his huge enjoyment of life, his exuberance and charm, his energy and capacity for work, his kindness and humor, his courtesy to his guests and his generosity with his friends. he once promis
of interconnected health care, energy, education policy. and it's all going to be mobile. and if it's mobile, you need spectrum. >> host: charla rath, vice president of verizon for wireless policy development. this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location in las vegas at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> and now, ricardo cortes talks about attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book
recall them and to lead them of energy you can clear your reactive mind and we rely on your rational mind then when you achieve that state you go clear. that book sold millions of copies in hubbard made millions of dollars and lost them as well even lost control of the name dianetics for a time and he decided there is another way. i jumped ahead and then missed a valuable part that you went to j.w. you. his father wanted him to be an engineer and he had another life in mind for himself. president of the gliding club and quite a adventuress character but he didn't finish. he was the miserable student and dropped out after two years although he claims he completed education and civil engineering but he did go on to right to dianetics then he invented the religion scientology. what is it exactly? there is a lot to know about of very eccentric world view and there are many elements in scientology that soundalike science fiction because there were written by someone gave britain something similar. that you are an immortal soul. in you have lived before and you will live again scientology helps
and then as the molecules separate and the energy dispates, it just breaks apart. everything is that way, and some -- some systems, it occurs quickly, and others it takes place over a longer period of time. he discovered what's the opposite of that. he studied open systems that have energy flowing into it and through it and out again, and what he fund was that when the flow of energy into an open system increases enough beyond a certain threshold, two things happen, the pattern of the system breaks down, but here's the surprising part, then the system reorganizes itself at a higher level of complexity. the whole feel of complexity, science came from that discovery, and the way we use the word "emergence," the phrase "emergent phenomena" really comes from that discovery so think for a minute about what happened over the last 20 # years with the internet. when bill clinton and i went into the white house in 1993, there were 50 sites on the worldwide web. now there's a trillion of them. look at what happened to newspaper all over the world. dallas part of -- that's part of the breakdown of the old pattern, b
to decompose in the forest naturally. and, of course, i have the energy saver lightbulbs. to change an entire house to energy saver lightbulbs saves as much electricity -- or i should say saves as much carbon in a year as moving to a walkable neighborhood saves in a week. so the whole what can i buy to make myself more sustainable is the wrong discussion. it should be where can i live and how can i live to contribute less. and the answer, again, is the city. this is fundamentally the opposite of the american ethos, you know? from jefferson on. cities are essential to the health and freedom of man. if we continue to pile upon ourselves in cities as they do in europe, we shall take to eating one another as they do there. [laughter] that was jefferson. and that just continued and continued. and it made sense back in the 1700s when we had the whole country to spread out on. but that's not the case now. so it's a longer discussion. all three of these are a longer discussion. but they're all national crises. we have a national economic crisis which is only going to get tougher, we have a national h
and gwen have less energy than when i was 40 years old. it is something one has to be aware of. >> i heard some turn back which suggests that human brain development was encouraged long-ago when grandmothers took over care of the children said the mother could do other foraging activities back in the foraging days. i'm thinking about that versus changes now with a grandmother isn't necessarily part of the picture. >> grandparents, grandmothers taking responsibility for k. while the parents of the kid go porridge. that is widespread. it's also the case that i mentioned and i would say is the case in most, all hunter gatherer societies to observe grandparents whosoever capable of doing it, take responsibility in looking after the children come in looking after the grandchildren, thereby freeing up their own children to go hunting and gathering. not just taiwan. [inaudible] >> general thing for brain development -- [inaudible] -- educational possibilities passed on by grandparents that parents don't do as much as grandparent do. >> most grandparents are 30, 40 years behind information to pass
projects designed to promote public works. yet none of these centuries and the time and energy they undoubtedly ensued cultivated litter the other scholarly interest, nor did they inhabit the long-term involvement in public affairs whether as a representative, political commentator, america's emerging constitutional framework and of course as a fighter for religious liberty. signing the declaration of independence, charles carroll put far, far more at risk economically speaking than any other of the sciences. he was natural to richest man in america at the time. but carroll's willingness to risk all this stuff for freedom demonstrated something else. carroll's convictions of more or more was at stake in britain's dispute with britain than just text as in some things are in fact more important than money. i think this all points to something. it is the need for conservatives and free marketers to embrace the argument persists europeanization to embrace the argument that the endgame of america's free enterprise system is not the endless acquisition of wealth. wealth is a means of
for america's factories and clothing energy. i went to a sustainable for so a few years ago a few years ago for my a few years ago for my pre-spoke was giving a talk and speakers, others did was a u.s. expert on biofuels. she talking about all kinds of biofuels i had heard of. filters toxics out of oil. great greater biofuel, and i learned a lot. i said what about cannabis. and she said best there is. best there is. magnitudes better than in terms of per acre. and i said what? don't you know? schedule one felony. we're not even allowed to talk about speak you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week.
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)